05
May
16

Egret in the wind

Watching a Little Egret in the wind last week we were taken with the feathering reminding us of white ferns.

Little Egret

03
May
16

Scattered

As we sat in the hide at Cley watching Black tailed Godwits they all of a sudden scattered. The reason; the largest female Peregrine I’ve seen in a long while came screaming in across the scrape at breakneck speed.

Peregrine

01
May
16

Look who’s in the flower bed

A big thank you to to Trevor and Gill Davies for letting people into their house to see the Wryneck that occupied their garden at Cley next the Sea this week. A well marked individual this one which made it look even more reptilian than usual. Fascinating woodpeckers these.

Wryneck

29
Apr
16

Shouting Loudly

It was hard to ignore this Cetti’s Warbler it was very shouty! Despite that it was also very stealthy as it popped up here, and then there, without even showing us how it got between the two!

Cettis Warbler

27
Apr
16

Three Cornered

As I settled down to do a Sea Watch at Mundesley the other week friend Andrew pointed out some Three cornered leeks (Allium triquetrum). When I looked the whole bank was covered in them. Quite a beautiful plant … but quite prolific.

Three cornered Leek

25
Apr
16

When is a bird Rare?

Some birds like the Californian Condor are truly rare. There are only a handful of them left. When the last one dies they will be extinct. No more Californian Condors unless Richard Attenborough can be recalled to ‘do a’ Jurassic Park and manifest a DNA clone.

However there is another connotation of rare status. That is, if a species is encountered infrequently out of its range … it could also be said to be rare; although within the confines of its home range the species could be quite common.

Below is a photograph I took last week of a Coot. As you know Coots are not rare and the photograph is not particularly special or indeed well taken. However, it is a photograph of a rare bird. Not because of what it is … but because of where it is.

This is only the second Coot I have seen on the local reservoir in 7 years. Mallards, Tufted Ducks, Gadwall, Teal and Wigeon come and go … but Coot … hereabouts are like Essex virgins. You see, between Hickling in the south east and Felbrigg in the west there is very little standing water. If you were a Coot why would you wish to visit an area with no standing water?

Wherever it came from it’s damn well easily spooked. You only have to show it the top of your hat and it bolts for the reedbed.

Coot

23
Apr
16

Six Species

Two of four passage Ring Ousels in wet pasture up here on the coast last week. All very fine males. In fact there were six species of thrush in the same field … but my word were they flighty!

Ring Ousel




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