Posts Tagged ‘Suffolk

17
Feb
22

FSC

A great time leading a course for the Field Studies Council at Flatford Mill in Suffolk over the last few days. A place steeped in history and some great participants on the course made for an enjoyable few days. Although the weather eventually drove us indoors on Tuesday, we had a fabulous day yesterday at Abberton Reservoir.

05
Jul
21

A few good birds

Lots of tours at the moment. Busy, busy, busy. A few good birds have cropped up en passant.

23
Aug
19

Egg laying Brown Hairstreak

A trip to Suffolk paid dividends at the weekend. Brown Hairstreak Butterflies were on the agenda but we did see so much more.

The Brown Hairstreaks are tree top dwelling insects and very rarely come down to ground level. The window for seeing them is pretty narrow; hence the reason they are so difficult to see. Around the third week in August, an hour either side of noon on sunny days the females fly down to Blackthrorn bushes. Between one and two metres from the ground they find a junction of a branch between old and new wood and lay a single white egg. She will repeat the egg laying process several times before returning to the canopy.

This back-lit photo shows just how beautiful these butterflies are. Next years tour for these beauties is set for Sunday 16th August – book early to avoid disappointment carl@wildlifetoursandeducation.co.uk

 

04
Jan
18

Over the border

A trip into Suffolk at the end of last month gave some astounding views of a Great Northern Diver near Lowestoft. Look at that incredible red eye. I wonder why the eye is such a red colour? It shares this feature with other divers and some of the grebes. Perhaps it aids sight in the dull light of murky water. Its eye was pointed skyward a few times. I feel sure the beast had seen something high in the air; a raptor perhaps? Try as I might I couldn’t see anything, but I’d be willing to bet my right arm there was something up there. I’m constantly amazed sometimes how the eyesight on birds has developed to an extent beyond our understanding.

 

24
Dec
17

Spector

A trip over the border into Suffolk gave us a few Mandarin and something I’ve never seen before. Looking like something spectoristic on the heath … the ghost of Christmas past? No an albino Highland Cow!! How cool is that?

Let me take this opportunity to wish everyone that reads ‘Letter from Norfolk’ and the posts on Facebook a very peaceful Christmas

 

13
Jun
16

ATTENTION!

Military Orchids are supposed to have acquired their name from the flower resembling a Napoleonic uniform. The ‘hat’ and the ‘tunic buttons’ are evident but it takes more than a little imagination. I prefer to think the name derived from the way they stand straight and proud like soldiers.

At the bank holiday we wandered amid a small area in North Suffolk containing 90% of the UK’s Military Orchid flower spikes. Found here in 1955 numbers have varied over the years and we are now left with this small area no bigger than a tennis court.

Military Orchid 1 Military Orchid 2

15
Jan
16

A volery of Long tailed tits

Some of the most charming Long tailed Tits I’ve seen in a while came down to some feeders when we were in a hide last week. All the feeders were inside a chicken mesh cage which excluded squirrels and larger birds. I counted around 25 in or around the cage at one point.

Long tailed Tit

 

11
Jan
16

Having a gander

A trip into Suffolk to see a pair of obliging Goosanders turned into a trip to Suffolk to see a pair of un-obliging Goosanders. Still, when they did show they were, as they always are, majestic birds; although I reckon one of them was telling a yarn about the size of fish she’d caught.

Goosander

Goosander 2

 

09
Jan
16

Tables turned

As we waited for birds to appear yesterday I heard a commotion above us. A Sparrowhawk was ambling through the sky. The local Crow took exception. Tables turned.

Sparrowhawk

10
Nov
15

A bird in the hand

There were quite a few fungi we stumbled across on our tours to Minsmere in Suffolk this last week. The Birds Nest Fungi is probably the most fascinating. I photographed these with a five pence piece to give some sense of scale; they are tiny. As the fruiting body ripens it reveals the ‘nest’ containing the spore cases which look similar to eggs sitting inside.

As raindrops splash into the cup they disperse the spore cases.

2015 10 27 Bird's Nest Fungi Minsmere Suffolk_Z5A3460




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