Archive for the 'plants' Category

19
Jul
17

Jurassic Coast

Earlier this month I took a hike to the south coast with some guests for a tour in Dorset. A series of nature walks gave us some great Nightjar views, a Fox with cubs, some rare orchids, a family of Polecats put on a fatal performance; we had some wonderful seabirds and mammals and that elusive reptile the Sand Lizard gave us a few sightings. A few photos follow. Sadly I shan’t be running this tour next year but it will make an appearance in the future I’m sure.

Dartford Warbler

Garden Warbler

Marbled White

Musk Orchid

Pyramidal Orchid

Rosel’s Bush Cricket

Wall Lizard

Great Green Bush Cricket

Stonechat

Black Darter

Bog Ashphodel

Common Tern

Keeled Skimmer

Rose Chafer

Sundew

Wolf Spider

Brown Long eared Bat

Harlequin Ladybird

Ruddy Darter

Small Red Damselfly

11
Jul
17

Lonely and Single

The single spike of Lesser Butterfly Orchid in the whole of Norfolk was in flower the other day. Or at least I don’t know of any others. It looked particularly lonely amid the Southern Marsh, Fragrant Orchids and the odd Marsh Helleborine. Lonely but beautiful.

03
Jun
17

Off the wall

Among the orchids we saw in Lancashire were these two beauties. Twyblade and Fly Orchid. The latter took some finding but keen eager eyes sought them out.

29
May
17

Small packages and good things

A visit to North Lancashire, the red rose county, saw us looking at some unimaginably beautiful orchids. Among them were Lady’s Slippers. Good things come in small packages.

27
Apr
17

Wales

A family break in Wales over the bank holiday weekend; but you take your camera and bins’ with you, don’t you?

White Bluebells

Bottlenose Dolphin

Bottlenose Dolphin

Chough

Early Purple Orchid

Raven

Red Kite

Red Kite

 

23
Apr
17

A flower without a bite

Just love these flowers. The chequerboard pattern on the petals  reminds me of an Elizabethan garden. Snakes Head Fritillary are not common but they can be sought out in the wild in a few places; usually in wet meadows or beside rivers.

26
Mar
17

A New Species to Science

In 2000 when Jonathan Revett collected what he described as a ‘fleshy form of the Rayed Earthstar at Cockley Cley, Norfolk. He sent specimens to Kew and other places but was assured that it was a known variant.

 

It was only several years later that DNA analysis uncovered that Jonathan’s discovery was indeed a new species; and so Geastrum britannicum was named. So far it has no common English name. Since the initial discovery several other sites throughout the UK and in particular Norfolk have come to light.




Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

July 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Archives


%d bloggers like this: