Posts Tagged ‘Accompanied Wildlife Tours

21
Mar
20

High Tide Interloper

A day or so after a full moon the tide will be high in the spring. Very high.

At Sheringham there are seemingly always a couple of wintering Purple Sandpipers. They love the granite rocks that protect the seafront. More often than not they feed and shelter among them avoiding crashing waves with amazing skill. However, when the tide is very high they leave their granite haven and venture up on to the promenade often being found among the Turnstone flocks. Out in the open they are more easily seen and photographed. We took advantage of this on our Norfolk Speciality Birds Long Weekend Tour two weeks ago.

 

04
Jan
20

The morning after

On the 1st of January we braved the crowds and ventured over to Holkham Hall. It took quite a while to make our way through the melee of people but make it we did.

A couple of Great White Egrets and the reported Black-necked Grebe were without the best birds but a Red Kite and a Marsh Harrier also put in an appearance.

Black-necked Grebes are one of those birds that are difficult to photograph. If the light is wrong and the exposure is not quite right they look like a waterborne devil. Sometimes they can take on the appearance of the hound of the Baskervilles’ or appear if they have bright red LED’s for eyes. The dull light on the 1st was ideal and the Grebe, perhaps the most difficult of the grebes to see well in Norfolk, was showing ideally.

 

26
Nov
19

“In-off”

We were stood on the beach a few weeks ago and watched as two distant specks became larger. As they got closer the two dark birds became wildfowl, then geese. Eventually they revealed themselves as a pair of Dark-bellied Brent Geese. Reaching the shore they circled and came down to the sand where they rested a while, before once again moving on.

31
May
19

Green around the gills

Green Hairstreaks look to be having a good first hatch this year. I wonder if the cooler spring suits them? We watched a pair ‘dancing’ around a crab apple tree earlier this month. This one repeatedly settled to rest in a small sheltered spot to be warmed in the sunshine.

21
Nov
18

Atlantic Greys

These adult Atlantic or Grey Seals were popping up around our boat the other week. When it comes to seals think ‘dog’ in terms of curiosity. They will always come close to check us out.

08
Jun
18

Crex Crex

The number of calling Corncrake on Mull this year was not as many as I’ve seen in previous years. I have a feeling numbers are again declining but this may be anecdotal. However, a little careful waiting aside a very friendly lady’s garden gave us good views of this very secretive bird.

31
Mar
18

A bone to pick and a beard to trim

Last week I was asked to identify a bone that had been found on Titchwell beach. If you are interested a photo and write up can be found here

The journey over to Titchwell from West Runton isn’t a short hop so I thought I’d go onto the reserve and take a few photos; making use of the time I had to enjoy myself. The sun was still low over the reserve, Titchwell comes into its own during the afternoon when the sun moves behind you; so conditions were not ideal for photography. However the Bearded Tit were performing so I fired off a few shots. I like the golden quality of ‘into the light photography’ that you often get in reedbeds.

It’s worth noting during my visit to Titchwell and the tour to Minsmere two days earlier I never saw or heard a Cetti’s Warbler. Purely anecdotal of course but I wonder if the recent cold weather has reduced numbers.

17
Nov
17

On Fire

The grey misty dank days of late autumn are lit up by the finding of the odd Firecrest. This one was in the Holm Oaks at Holkham Hall. What a delight to see. They have to be my favourite British Bird.

18
Aug
17

Magnificent Beast

He may look a little coy but don’t let him fool you, this magnificent beast is a predator. He’ll have one of your fingers off in heartbeat. This large male Grey Seal was basking off the boat on one of our tours the other week.

06
Aug
17

Snouty

The Common Shrew is one of the two most commonest mammals in the UK. However despite that they are hardly ever seen; most often observed by cat owners or clutched in the talons of Barn Owls and Kestrels. They are without doubt elusive. When you are just a couple of inches long I guess it pays not to put yourself on general show.

It was Phil who pointed out the grass moving as we returned to the vehicle. We were out on tour in the overflow car park at Hickling NWT. The twitching grass yielded this little fella. Nose or what?




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