Posts Tagged ‘birds

02
Dec
22

Bathing beauties

Don’t you just love a Purple Sandpiper?

28
Nov
22

Les Oiseaux d’Ore

So … someone said she wanted a Golden Eagle for her birthday. Who am I to say no?

Golden Eagles are never easy on mainland Britain. I set expectations low. Who knew I was with an Eagle Whisperer? Three birds of various ages joined the four Buzzards and thirteen Ravens around the corpse of a Red Deer within 20 minutes. Job done.

12
Apr
22

choughs

In Wales a couple of weeks ago the Chough were dancing in the wind over the cliffs and sea. Love the playfulness of these corvids.

31
Mar
21

Fancy a Chat?

This young male Black Redstart was taking advantage of the fly bonanza on the undercliff at West Runton.

Now that full lock-down has started to ease it’s just great to get out and have a chat!

04
Feb
21

A walk to the Sea

The sea was full this morning; overflowing at the edges and pushing at the base of the cliffs. No wind so no waves but the swell was well over 2m. I had hoped a cetacean or two may break the surface but only a couple of Grey Seals put in an appearance.

Skylarks gave a backing to the percussion of Great Tits as I arrived at the cliff top. Plenty of Red-throated Divers still and the odd Brent moving West and then presumably back North; even a Great crested Grebe was on the sea evading the attentions of fish stealing gulls. However, there were a few new kids on the block. The Fulmars were back. On the cliffs, on the sea and gliding effortlessly by. Spring is around the corner.

21
Dec
20

Bald as a Coot

If Great Tit’s did Darth Vader…

23
May
20

Migrants

A couple of the commoner migrants in the last few days.

 

23
Apr
20

Bits and Pieces

A few bits and pieces seen during the lockdown exercise walks in and around West Runton within the first half of April.

Quite a number of Stonechat wintered locally. Slowly numbers dwindled away in March/April as they moved back to their breeding areas

Thanks to Andy at Northrepps giving us ‘the shout’ a group of Cranes were picked up as they did their usual spring jaunt along the North Norfolk coast.

I’ve been surprised at the number of Red Kites seen on the coast this spring. I usually spend much of April each year in Scotland so never have a real chance of seeing these wonderful raptors on home turf

Wheatears are a wonderful hearald of Spring. Numbers got to around 17 in a single field on at least one day.

Given the lack of people around Foxes have been taking advantage and coming out more during the day. As a consequence we’ve found at least two dens we didn’t know where there.

Skylarks have been everywhere this April. Starting to pair and nest, fling North out to sea and coasting along the clifftops.

There have been four resident Kestrels entertaining us. This male was particularly bold.

We had up to eight Ring Ouzels in one field during the peak of passage

Several Green Woodpeckers around the village

Blackcap are now back in good numbers

Chiffchaff singing everywhere but few Willow Warblers at the moment

Lots of local Linnet but also a continuous movement east in the first few weeks of April

29
Mar
20

Larks Down

I’ve not seen as many Woodlark in Norfolk this year. It’s completely unverified but I get the impression numbers are down. However, we did come across this showy individual a few weeks ago that was completely unintimidated as it walked ahead of us through a car park.

 

01
May
19

Snowbie

On the Scottish Tour earlier this month one of the several key species we aim to see is Snow Bunting. They breed high in the Scottish mountains so their plumage is far different from the somewhat drab wintering birds we see in Norfolk. We found this skulking male in among a rock wall sheltering from the wind.

Next years tours to Scotland in April are now advertised. Two trips to choose from. Details are here and here




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