Posts Tagged ‘Wildlife Photography



13
Dec
21

I’m a fan

I’ve always been a fan of the Dartford Warbler. An iconic species that is represented in Norfolk by possibly the most Northerly population in the world.

We waited for around an hour in a cold wind for one to show last week. I know it was there as I’d heard it chuntering from inside the gorse. This is a species that shows on it’s own terms. However, I could see the blue sky on the horizon slowly working it’s way towards us. A little sunshine always helps to procure a sighting and sure enough he eventually sat atop his thorny perch; even fanning his tail for us.

05
Dec
21

Some people should just be barred

The roads at Wiveton are narrow. Visitors to the Barred Warbler were asked not to park on the road or verges; but one idiot still did. Churning up the verge in front of resident’s houses. No wonder suppression of sightings seems to be on the increase. This attitude promotes it. The ignorance of some people just raises my hackles. ‘It doesn’t apply to me’. ‘I’ve no need to give way’. ‘I’ve no need to wear a mask’. ‘The injection program doesn’t apply here’. Pure unadulterated arrogance. I’m tiring of uncooperative people. Some should just be barred!

However … the Barred Warbler luckily didn’t take any notice of the raised voices behind me. This is the latest I’ve seen one in the UK. By now it should be feeding in some Turkish Olive grove. Normally long gone from our shores by December, this young bird did what Barred’s normally don’t do; it showed surprisingly well. Tania and I enjoyed watching it feed on insects within the ivy covered hawthorns. Why is it here? I think a quick look around any trees on the coast will give you the answer; many are still in leaf. We’ve not really had any frost to speak of as yet. There’s still a veritable insect larder within foliage.

I wonder if this bird will over winter? I suspect not, but I’d love to revisit it in March when it would be starting to look like a Barred Warbler at its best.

30
Oct
21

You’re having a Lark …

Friend Andrew has a great view from his bedroom window here in the village. That’s how he found the Short toed Lark among Skylarks and Linnet that were feeding on the fresh plow in the field opposite.

I couldn’t get down the road to see it yesterday but I called at first light this morning. It eventually flew in from the South West corner of the field and showed pretty well before the rain set in. However, it was always pretty distant. I left it until later in the day when fewer people were around and the sun came out before I tried again. Tania joined me on the clifftop after she finished work and we both enjoyed good views as it slowly made its way over the field towards us.

28
Oct
21

Gathering

There are several post migratory gatherings of Stone Curlews within Norfolk. Numbers drain away through October as birds move South and make their way into the beautiful dark continent. Given the mild weather perhaps more than usual still remain.

13
Oct
21

Not just rares

Those that have never visited the Isles of Scilly may be under the impression it’s only for those chasing rarer birds Not so. Some common species are at their easiest to photograph here.

09
Oct
21

A trip to see a trip

A slow walk north along the full length of Tresco is like drinking a fine wine. It has to be done slowly and enjoyed. Overcast with rain was gradually replaced with warm bright sunshine and the Scillies excelled at what it is best at … being beautiful.

In our annual trip to the archipelago we took a boat to Carn Near from St Mary’s, where we are staying, and made our way up the island to Castle Down. It’s years since I’ve been up to the North end of the Tresco but it was just as special as I remembered it. Gosh it was warm. A flyover Siskin reminded me it was October. Three Dotterel were thrown in for free with an added bonus of a pod of Harbour Porpoise offshore. What more could we ask for …

31
Aug
21

Small but perfectly formed

No more than a few millimetres. A perfectly formed Heath Snail.

27
Aug
21

On the Web

Tania found a Wasp Spider the other day when we were on tour. It’s intriguing why the web would have such an interesting zig-zag patterning, called a ‘stabilimentum’ always weaved into its lower half.

23
Jul
21

Odds and Sods

A few photos from this spring and summer, taken on tours around the county and country, that I haven’t had time to post previously …

19
Nov
20

A Desert thirst for birds

Not a lot around locally at the moment other than a smattering of Dusky Warblers and this little chap.

Normally Desert Wheatears manage to turn up in the country at this time of the autumn. I’m lucky in that this little lad turned up not more than a few miles away down the coast. Tania and I spent a little time watching him on Sunday last. His range was vast and getting close to him was near impossible. I went back on Monday to see if I could get a better photo of him. He had settled down quite a bit since the previous day and was less flighty; favouring the sandy parts of a small cliff out of the wind where Sand Martins nest in the summer. Although this may have been because others had put down one or two mealworms. I say ‘may’ because I saw the bird pull one from the sand but on closer inspection of the area, when the bird wasn’t present, I couldn’t see any more.

I’m not keen on feeding birds (or other wildlife) away from bird tables for several reasons. Although there are arguments the other way too. However overall I’m against it.

The bird was an adult male. Normally they are washed out juvenile/female types. This is the first adult male I can remember seeing and he was quite a dapper individual. A real stonker. There are apparently several races within the species range of North Africa East to Mongolia. Although exactly where this individual is from, according to Shirihai ‘Birds of Israel’ p448, is indeterminable from plumage features visible in the field.




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