Posts Tagged ‘Waders

05
Aug
22

Wader-fest

The reserve at Frampton in Lincolnshire without doubt will become an RSPB showpiece. There are certain improvements going on at the moment that will make it irresistible to visitors. Both avian and human.

Barbara, Carol, Richard and Ross accompanied me on a tour there last week. We had a good number of passing Yellow Wagtails but without doubt the highlight was the wader-fest presented before us. A wide range of species in great numbers.

18
Sep
18

Spat

The feeding behavior of waders here in North Norfolk is sometimes interesting to watch. It’s not impossible to find a flock of Ruff feeding in complete harmony side by side and then on another occasion it seems as though they’re at war. These two Ruff were having a particular vicious spat with one limping away from the encounter.

20
Jan
15

A lone bather

Where streams enter the sea is a good place to look for gulls and waders, they often come to drink and bathe in the fresh water. We stood and watched such a stream here in North Norfolk the other day; a steady trickle of bubbling life wended across the beach only to be swallowed by the expanse of the sea.

A procession of Herring, Black headed and Greater Black backed Gulls took it in turn to visit. Amid the thirty or so Turnstones was just a single Ringed Plover that bathed and then preened carefully.

Ringed Plover

02
Aug
14

Arrivals

.

The arrival of returning waders signals the end of our long warm summer days. Gathering on the coastal marshes are Black tailed Godwits; some still resplendent in their breeding dress.

As we waited yesterday for birds to come closer the light was failing and clouds gathering to the west; a storm was on its way. A Sparrowhawk took the opportunity to hunt the scrape before the rain arrived and the Godwits detonated into the air.

.

Black tailed Godwit

 

15
Feb
14

A Very Muddy Morning Out

Mud between your toes doesn’t feel all that good. One of us had already lost one pair of wellies and I was about to loose mine. Thankfully the marsh gave me both feet back intacto.

It wasn’t an easy search for the Jack Snipe. The problem was they sat so tight. I almost trod on one before it took flight. I’d been stood within inches of it for around 15 minutes. I couldn’t see it. These tiny waders are just the masters of camouflage. Photographing them was dependent on seeing them before they shot off like a feather bullet. After two hours stood in ankle deep water we gave up. My feelings were mixed. I was disappointed not to photograph one, elated to have seen them and full of marvel for a species that had well and truly beaten us … this time.

A walk back to the car was sprinkled with a few Siskin and a nice flock of Crossbill but somehow they didn’t make up for not seeing the Jack Snipe on the deck. I still felt cheated. The Bean Goose we saw later came close to recompense. It was only when watching this lone goose with its Pink footed mate I saw the Red Kite circling above me. Perhaps now the debt had been paid.

Tundra Bean Goose

04
Dec
13

Beachrunner

Just love the Sanderlings that play here on the beaches in Winter; never wanting to get their feet wet but always wanting to be at the water’s edge. Francis Duggan got it right in his poem

‘The Sanderling’

The sanderlings run up and down the bay
And from incoming waves they run away

Sanderling

08
Sep
12

Mystery Bird September

Everyone who entered got last month’s mystery ‘bird’ correct. The only dragonfly we have with Brown Wings is the Brown Hawker. Well done if you got this one. The photo was taken of our obliging individual at Waveney River Centre on the Norfolk/Suffolk border, one of the best places I know for this species.

This month we’re back to birds proper. Given the waders are moving through on migration at the moment it seems appropriate to pitch in with a wading species for our Septembers Mystery Bird.

Take a look at the photograph below. As normal send in your entry to carl@wildlifetoursandeducation.co.uk.




Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Nov 2022
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Archives


%d bloggers like this: