Posts Tagged ‘North Norfolk



28
Nov
16

A bit of a tale

A Long tailed Duck has been seemingly resident on the Cley reserve at Salthouse for quite some weeks now. It was joined, when I saw it last week, by another. They weren’t close. We waited some time for them to swim a little nearer … but they never did. LTD’s are one of the hardest ducks to photograph here in Norfolk. The harbours of Scotland are the best bet for a few splendid Oldsquaw males!

long-tailed-duck

21
Nov
16

Larking About

Stood in the last of the afternoon light last week we approached a small flock of Shorelark. They were a little flighty but as they settled down to feed we ventured a little closer. It took around 30 minutes to get close enough. However being quiet, careful of our shadows and movements seemed to no avail as a lady bowled up the beach and bellowed out ‘What are you looking at?’ Needless to say the flock immediately took flight much to the chagrin of at least one of my companions. Although all was not lost as the seeds from the horned poppies (which have the longest seedpod of any British flower) proved too much temptation as another lady collecting jetsam further up the beach flushed them back!

2016-11-18-shorelark-salthouse-norfolk_z5a3934

03
Nov
16

Something Small

We were driving on the Norfolk coast road when I saw something small scuttle across the tarmac just in front of the car. I noticed it came to rest on the verge so I pulled over and walked back to investigate. Crouched on the verge was a Short tailed Field Vole. .. counting its blessings at still being alive and not being part of the road.

field-vole

08
Oct
16

Beach Cutie

We were walking down the beach the other day and this little cutie popped up at the side of us. Grey Seals can be endearing as anything or as ugly as sin.

grey-seal-2

30
Sep
16

Bunkered

What is it about gold courses? Yet another nice bird at Brancaster this week. Originally seen flying in off the sea and heading inland this Hoopoe took a while to pin down. It eventually settled to feed for the best part of the week in the bunkers and on the fairways of the golf course. Very many thanks to the management and players that allowed access in a very gracious way to all that wanted to see and photograph the bird. More photos can be found within the ‘latest section’ of the Wildcatch Photography site. http://wildcatchphotography.zenfolio.com/?q=hoopoe

hoopoe

 

15
Sep
16

Grey’s

A trip out with Temple Seal Trips a week last Sunday was enjoyable. Derek and Jim, the crew and skipper, certainly make the trip as good as it is!

grey-seal-1 grey-seal-2 grey-seal-3 grey-seal-4

25
May
16

Just out of short trousers

A spring  Red breasted Flycatcher is rare enough but this one aside the cricket ground in Overstrand was singing. No red chested songster this one; not even a rose flush. However, the worn coverts concealed the remnants of a partial wingbar. A first year bird … just into long trousers. A smart find for someone … we know not whom.

Red breasted Flycatcher

09
May
16

Raptor fest

The warm weather with a gentle southerly last Bank Holiday Sunday prompted a raptor fest here on the hill. Initially came the first of the dozen or so Buzzards. A Sparrowhawk flying high and circling east was followed by a Short eared Owl that flew over and then landed in the garden. It didn’t stop long; the Magpies wouldn’t let it. A phone call from Andy in the village told of three Kites coming my way. Sure enough flying high over the cottage were the distinctive form of a trio of Red Kites. As I was looking at these a Hobby flashed through my view; my first for the year.

Hobby

25
Apr
16

When is a bird Rare?

Some birds like the Californian Condor are truly rare. There are only a handful of them left. When the last one dies they will be extinct. No more Californian Condors unless Richard Attenborough can be recalled to ‘do a’ Jurassic Park and manifest a DNA clone.

However there is another connotation of rare status. That is, if a species is encountered infrequently out of its range … it could also be said to be rare; although within the confines of its home range the species could be quite common.

Below is a photograph I took last week of a Coot. As you know Coots are not rare and the photograph is not particularly special or indeed well taken. However, it is a photograph of a rare bird. Not because of what it is … but because of where it is.

This is only the second Coot I have seen on the local reservoir in 7 years. Mallards, Tufted Ducks, Gadwall, Teal and Wigeon come and go … but Coot … hereabouts are like Essex virgins. You see, between Hickling in the south east and Felbrigg in the west there is very little standing water. If you were a Coot why would you wish to visit an area with no standing water?

Wherever it came from it’s damn well easily spooked. You only have to show it the top of your hat and it bolts for the reedbed.

Coot

09
Apr
16

Darting

Dartford Warblers appear to have had a decent winter. Good numbers on the heath. This male flitted past us the other week but was gone before I could get a decent shot.

Dartford Warbler




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