Posts Tagged ‘Bird and Wildlife Photography



13
Oct
15

Winter approaches

It must be winter … Snow Bunting a Cley last week.

Snow Bunting

19
Apr
15

I couldn’t resist

When you spend a little time with such an enigmatic species like a Ring Ouzel it’s difficult to stop taking photographs. After the photo of the male I posted a few days ago I thought I’d pop up a shot of the female (type) that also came into the garden this week. However… I just couldn’t resist posting a few more of that corking male too. There’s just something about them that mystifies me.

Ring Ousel

Ring Ousel 1 Ring Ousel 2 Ring Ousel 3

07
Apr
15

Adding up the weather for a cool search

A cold March morning last week we stood and quietly watched. Cold but bright is the key to seeing Adders. It took a little while but one or two eventually came to bathe in the sunshine. Spreading themselves flat to absorb the sun’s rays we kept clocking them up. Eleven in all came to join the party.

Adder

31
Jan
15

A firey vision

Looking at holiday footage of ‘birdy’ friends’ the other day prompted me to look back at some of my own photos taken some years ago in South America.

Swinging in a Hammock on the veranda of a rainforest lodge high in the Andes of Ecuador I remember opening one eye and glancing sideways. The vision of a Flame faced Tanager met me.

Flame-Faced TanagerIMG_2369

 

03
Dec
14

Something for a rainy day

A very rainy weekend in Norfolk had Andy and me clicking our heels. We decided to spend a little time within a forecasted weather window down at Cromer Pier. Trying hard to find something of note among the gulls … we failed … as miserably as the weather. Even a loaf of Sharon’s best homemade could not muster a Caspian or a Yellow legged on this dark dank day.

The only things we could find of interest were a Greater Black Back with some odd bill feathering and an adult Black headed that despite being in winter plumage had the subtlest of pink suffusions to its underparts. There’s always something to look at even when it’s raining stair rods.

Greater Black Backed Gull Z5A2385Black headed Gull 1 Z5A2329 Black headed Gull 2 Z5A2327

 

29
Nov
14

Fierce?

How can such a fierce predator look so cute?

Stoat

 

27
Nov
14

Uplanders

Out across the marsh flew a wheeling flock of finches. I could see Goldfinch among them … and Linnet. By far the majority however were Twite. We estimated maybe 90 to 110 of these beautiful uplanders. It looks like Twite at last have had a good year as flocks on the coast are beginning to gain in number and size. I guess they could be from the Pennines (or maybe even Wales). At least one in the flock bore colour rings so we should be able to find out eventually.

Twite

 

26
Nov
14

Norfolk Wing 2014/15

Some interesting articles on Capercailles, Sea Watch Foundation, Norfolk Cetaceans, our new tours and much more…

See the  publication at http://issuu.com/wildlifetoursandeducation/docs/norfolk_wing_7060aa543c99dd

The Norfolk Wing Cover

22
Sep
14

OBP

To any autumn bird watcher those three initials; O.B.P., can mean only one thing … Olive Backed Pipit.

This bird of the Siberian Taiga was formerly known as Indian Tree Pipit and can be as crepuscular as it’s possible for a bird to be. One lurking in the very dark depths of the long grass and brambles within the wooded area of Wells next the Sea known as the Dell set birders a challenge to see it let alone permit its image to be stolen. Getting a 400mm F2.8 lens atop a fully extended tripod into a suitable position among brambles, rose suckers and miscellaneous vegetation at a time when the bird showed was more good luck than judgement. I’m still pulling out the thorns.

 

2014 09 20 Olive backed Pipit Wells next the Sea Norfolk_Z5A4875

 

29
Aug
14

Spiralis

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Delicate and small we eventually found them. The grass had been mown late; far too late. The orchids had probably been topped. However, we searched anyway and Bob managed to find a couple of spikes that were so small they’d escaped the blades.

Autumn Ladies Tresses are so called because of their resemblance to plaits of hair. This is also reflected within the Latin name of Spiranthes spiralis. I’m not sure what the passing builders thought of me lying flat out on the ground photographing them but it sparked enough interest for them to ask a few questions about what they were.

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Autumn Ladies Tresses




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